Coming Soon Landing Pages

6 Coming Soon Landing Page Examples to Build A Waitlist For Your Next Launch

Gearing up to launch a new product or service? A "coming soon" landing page builds excitement and captures leads for when you’re ready to launch. This guide shares six coming soon landing page examples, plus templates & tips on building your own.

Launching a new product, service, or business is exciting. But, it’s not uncommon to completely forget about sharing your pre-launch excitement with prospective customers.

A "coming soon" landing page does exactly that.

It gets your target audience excited about your new 'thing,' and collects their email address so you’ll build a list of people ready to buy when it’s available 🙌

So, how do you create a coming soon landing page? And more importantly, what should it include? This guide shares six coming soon landing page examples to draw inspiration from, alongside ready-to-use templates to get you started.

What is a "coming soon" landing page?

A coming soon landing page is a URL that announces a new product, service, or business you’re launching. The goal of one is to get your audience excited and opt-in to hear from you once the product is launched.

What to include on your coming soon landing page

A coming soon landing page is just look any other landing page in the sense that it's simply trying to persuade visitors to take a specific action. The only difference is that your "offer" is centered around something that's happening in the future.

With this in mind, a good coming soon page needs to have certain information to make it useful to potential customers, such as:

  • Product value prop. What's the benefit of the actual product or service that's coming soon? Why would someone want what you're in the process of building?
  • Waitlist value prop. Sometimes an exciting product isn't enough to capture someone's email address on a waitlist. So make sure to communicate what exactly visitors will get after joining the list. E.g. behind-the-scenes launch information, launch discounts, or jump their space on a waiting list.
  • Inspiring imagery. Showing imagery of MVPs or prototypes can create excitement for what you're building. It also acts as proof that it's actively being worked on and could be ready to use soon.
  • Call-to-action (CTA). Because products and services you’re promoting through this type of landing page aren’t ready to buy just yet, the CTA should usually be to join an email list. That way, you can send an email broadcast to everyone who showed interest in the upcoming product.
  • Deadline/launch date. People will want to know when to expect your product or service to become available. If a specific launch date isn't possible, try to at least give a rough timeframe for completion.
  • Social sharing buttons. Building hype around a new product, service, or business can boost the chances of hitting revenue targets because more people know about it. So, have social sharing buttons on your coming soon landing page to incentivize people into sharing it with their own network.

Coming soon landing page examples

Now we know what one should look like, let’s take a look at six coming soon landing page examples to demonstrate each element in action.

1. Float coming soon landing page

Float uses its coming soon landing page to promote its new software. Above the fold, you’ll notice a simple form that asks for a visitor’s email address to request access:

What’s interesting about this landing page, though, is its use of social proof immediately above the form: "Join Blake, Zack, and 2,368 others."

This eases any concerns someone has about entering their information. It also enforces the fear of missing out (FOMO)—a feeling which causes 60% of millennial to make a reactive purchase within 24 hours.

SEE MORE: 7 FOMO Marketing Ideas You Can Start Using Today For More Conversions

2. Freelance Bold course coming soon page

Here’s a great example of a coming soon landing page for a new website. Instead of being incentivized to join the list to hear when the website launches, Freelance Bold gives something of extra value immediately—a free email course:

The free email course gives the brand a reason to regularly communicate with people interested in what they have to offer. That consistent communication means when the time comes to launch the full website, people are excited and ready to browse.

3. Digital PR Course video coming soon page

This coming soon landing page example from Digital PR Course follows a similar style. It explains that the course isn’t ready to buy yet, but if they enter their email address, they’ll get early access when it launches:

The landing page also includes a video that explains the upcoming course in detail.

The value proposition is clear, and people know exactly what they’re signing up for, but the video just adds that extra layer of detail. It also caters to the 72% of people who prefer to learn about new products through video.

4. Hypertype value prop coming soon page

You only get a few seconds to make a first impression on someone visiting your coming soon landing page. This example from Hypertype shows how to play on a pain point above the fold: spending too much time composing business emails.

The page as a whole goes on to showcase how the new product will solve a real problem for its target audience. It utilizes some nice imagery as well as giving a clear CTA to gain early access.

5. Communyco app coming soon landing page

Communyco used their website home page as a way to build hype around its soon-to-launch software. It promises early access in return for an email address:

Trust signals—like logos of the Apple and Google Play App Store—also help to reinforce the fact that the new business can be trusted with their email address.

You’ll also notice that Communyco has social sharing buttons towards the bottom of its coming soon landing page. It helps to build hype and expand the app's reach if potential customers share it with their friends.

6. Argos ecommerce product pre-order page

If you’re creating a coming soon page for a product, take notes from Argos. Instead of asking a potential customer for their email address, it uses a pre-order model:

People who want to buy the upcoming game can enter their payment information to have it shipped as soon as it's released. There’s also a clear note above the "add to cart" button that explains when it will be delivered. 

This reduces any friction between signing up to be notified and actually buying the item when it launches.

Too much time between the two and there’s a risk of people no longer being interested. But, you overcome that obstacle if you collect their payment information upfront and charge them once it’s in stock 🙌

Coming soon landing page templates

Whether you’re creating a coming soon landing page for a new product, service, feature, or business, you’ll notice that a good one has certain things in common. 

Take the stress out of creating yours with our landing page templates. Each one is professionally designed and contains the elements you’ll need to entice people into signing up—such as your email address form, brand logo, and headline.

Simply replace the placeholder text with information about your upcoming product.

Here are a few template ideas to get you started:

About the author

Elise Dopson

Contributor, ConvertFlow
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Elise is a writer at ConvertFlow, and expert in B2B marketing. She's been featured in publications like ConversionXL, HubSpot, CoSchedule, Content Marketing Institute, Databox, and more. You'll usually find her cooking up some high-quality content for the ConvertFlow blog or campaign library.